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Theme Catchup2018 - posted on 1st May 2018 at 1:50 PM
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Field Researcher
#51 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 10:30 PM Last edited by opiumgirl : 1st Feb 2012 at 10:45 PM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfire Mouse
I'm making banana bread today.


Please share your recipe since I love banana bread but all I end up making is banana mush.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Spitfire Mouse
An update on our mead, in case anyone was wondering. We took a class this weekend and we've done most everything right since we followed a recipe. The instructor stated a specific time for racking the mead for secondary fermentation, but my husband thinks we don't need to since the recipe didn't call for it. I really think we should follow the instructor's directions. If we don't, I'm not sure if I want to drink our mead when it's ready.


I had mead once, it was kind of like something the cat made, but sweet. maybe it was really bad mead? My medieval self really want to believe that mead is like ambrosia!

btw would anybody like me to share my sister-in-law's blog?
When I don't know what to make for supper I always look there. She is also the best cook I have ever met and this includes a number of chefs. I live in envy of my brother
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#52 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 10:45 PM
@Opiumgirl: I would love to see your sister's blog. I'm always on the lookout for good recipes and ideas which is why I started this thread

@ Spitfire and Opiumgirl: A friend of mine made some mead once and it was delicious! There's a local meadery nearby and their bottles suggest that there are many kinds of mead similar to the kinds of wine: fruity, dry, or sweet. There was more, but that was as much as I made note of.

@ Spitfire: Mmmm - homemade pizza! Mmmm! I wish my son was here. He does a fanatastic job with pizza, carefully constructing a crust and baking it on the hottest oven we can manage. He is fussy and particular in all the details: They type of tomatoes in the sauce, which seasonings, the quality of the cheese, and the use of fresh basil. It's a gourmet treat when he's home and cooking.

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
dodgy builder
#53 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 10:55 PM
I made sensa glutine pancakes today. Had almond flour, african jytte flour, italian panacotta, milk and eggs. It tasted like shit . Need to do some serious changes for next time I make it. Like having more milk and egg, and less blabla ... or something.
Field Researcher
#54 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 11:00 PM
here you go!
http://thefoodfox.com/
As for mead, that is good to know, because I cannot believe what I tasted is all there is, but I live in wine country and mead is not known here.
We tend to be, wine olives and cheese
Mad Poster
#55 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 11:06 PM
Grass-fed lamb liver and onions (oh, Peni--!) and cauliflower.

My 10-year-old likes it. We both like liver with ketchup.

Trying to make it so my family eats better...a store opened up recently that's like an indoor, year-round farmers' market.

My Riverblossom Hills blog! Alexandra's Riverblossom Hills
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#56 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 11:32 PM
@Opiumgirl - thanks for the link! I checked it out. Those are some amazing recipes! The photography is rather spectacular too.

@Alexandra - That's great that your 10-year-old will eat that! He has unusual tastes!

I don't eat liver anymore since I'm a vegetarian, but when I did, I found that no amount of ketchup would ever cover the taste of it. My friend and I used to try to eat it once a week when we first left home to live somewhere else (we were on an adventure). We found that sour cream covers the taste of everything and we enjoyed liver and onions smothered in the stuff.

Farmers' markets and similar stores are great! I buy a share in a local organic farm every summer which means I am challenged to make something out of the bundles of vegetables that we pick up each week. I've not only learned to love greens, I start to crave them when I don't have them. Every week is an adventure.

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
Mad Poster
#57 Old 1st Feb 2012 at 11:37 PM
I've loved liver and ketchup since childhood myself...and got made fun of for it once!

I get the grass-fed beef, bratwurst, chicken patties...good stuff. And raw-milk cheese...I've been eating that and I haven't had a cold so far this winter, haven't even had my usual fall allergies (they can sell it so long as it's been aged a certain amount of time).

My Riverblossom Hills blog! Alexandra's Riverblossom Hills
Lab Assistant
#58 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 12:35 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by VerDeTerre
@ Spitfire: Mmmm - homemade pizza! Mmmm! I wish my son was here. He does a fanatastic job with pizza, carefully constructing a crust and baking it on the hottest oven we can manage. He is fussy and particular in all the details: They type of tomatoes in the sauce, which seasonings, the quality of the cheese, and the use of fresh basil. It's a gourmet treat when he's home and cooking.


I have to admit I'm a bit of a food snob at times and will do the same thing. Unfortunately it's not always easy to find good tomatoes so I usually stick with canned when I make my sauce.

However, I do often use Fleischmann's Pizza Yeast and the recipe for the crust on the back. We rarely actually plan to make pizza so a standard crust recipe will take too long to rise. The only time we do plan is when I make lasagna because there's always sauce left over.


Quote:
Originally Posted by opiumgirl


Ooo, foodie blog! Wonderful!!


Yes, mead is no longer only sweet. It's very much like wine or champagne, it can be sweet or dry and anything in between. It depends mostly on the honey you use as well as the yeast. Even the same honey from year to year can be different depending on what the bees have been harvesting from. If you add fruit or use fruit juices instead of water, spices or herbs the outcome and what it's called is also different. There was a LOT of information packed into our 2 hour class.

We have a number of meaderies in CO and it's been nice to try some different flavors. We're hoping once we're able to buy a house that we'll be zoned for beehives. Then we'll at least be able to consider having our own hive(s) since honey isn't exactly cheap in bulk. But for now, we're only making 1 gallon batches so it doesn't require a lot of honey. I'm not much for the real sweet versions and I like a bit of carbonation. The instructor had samples of a prickly pear mead that was excellent in flavor, but the texture was thicker like a liqueur which I didn't care for. It's going to be fun just to try different combinations. Too bad it takes such a long time to get your final product.


Here's the recipe I use for Banana Bread

Preheat oven to 350°

2 cups All Purpose Flour
1 tsp Baking Powder
1/2 tsp Baking Soda
1/2 tsp Salt
1 tsp Ground Cinnamon
1/4 tsp Ground Nutmeg (optional)
1/2 cup (1 stick) Butter, unsalted and softened
3/4 - 1 cup Sugar
1 Egg
5 Tbsp Milk
1 tsp Vanilla
3 Bananas, medium size and mashed
1/2 - 1 cup Pecans or Walnuts, chopped (optional)

Mix the dry ingredients together in a separate bowl.
In a large bowl, cream the butter and sugar together until well blended.
Add the egg and vanilla, mix well.
Stir in the bananas.
Fold in half the dry ingredients, then the milk, then the remaining dry and nuts.
Spread batter in a well greased loaf pan.
Bake 40-60 minutes or until a toothpick or tester comes out clean or with very few crumbs.
Let cool in pan for about 10 minutes, then remove carefully and let cool on a rack.




Some notes:
- The sugar amount varies depending on how sweet your like your bread as well as how sweet the bananas are. I usually let my bananas go until the skins are completely brown and starting to go black, so they're very sweet. I also prefer brown sugar to white in my bread. dark brown or light, either one works fine.

- The spice amount can be changed depending on your own taste. 1 tsp of cinnamon is a good amount to start with, but sometimes I make it a very generous tsp. Nutmeg is optional. Some people don't like it in their bread. I always use fresh grated.

- I always hate when a recipe says "small", "med", or "large" and how many as a form of measurement. This recipe uses that and I honestly can't remember the actual measured amount. To me a medium banana is one that's about 6-7 inches, which is pretty standard in the grocery stores. So 3 of those is what I use. It might work out to about 2 cups. Don't quote me on that.

- I rarely put nuts in my banana bread since my husband isn't a huge fan of nuts in baked goods. 1/2 to 1 cup is just a guideline. I always use pecans if I'm going to use nuts and toast them lightly.

I have the America's Test Kitchen recipe for banana bread and I really want to try it. It's more involved and requires more bananas, so I stuck with my standard. If I get around to making it, I'll post results.

I just pulled my bread out after about 52 minutes and it's perfect. I think that's my dinner. If my husband hurries and gets home, I might let him have a piece.
Field Researcher
#59 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 7:48 AM
@ VerDeTerre: She does her own photography. I am always hungry after seeing all that beautiful food!

@ Spitfire Mouse: Thank you for the recipe!
Scholar
#60 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 8:20 AM
People who eat chex mix find this gross but Iaugh in their face. I melted some butter in the nuke (mircrowave) mixed in some spices mixed in corn flakes till it coated them thinly waited for them to turn kinda soft threw them on tin foil then put them in the toaster oven toasting them till they are nice and crispy agian. Also good to do with cheerios NOM. It honestly is a really good eat if poeple would stop being so judgemental. Look at how much sodium is in usual mixes it's nuts. This way you can limit the level of salt and add nummy flavors like onions, garlic, bazil. The possibilities are endless.

Disclaimer: I am just being a goof ball, please ignore me if offended.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#61 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 11:01 AM
Drowny, it sounds good to me. What spices do you use?

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
Scholar
#62 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 11:45 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by VerDeTerre
Drowny, it sounds good to me. What spices do you use?


Look what is in your cabinet there is no boundries. Some nights I mix curry spice, teeny bit of salt, and onions, and a little garlic to make like a curry flavor. Other nights I add pramasan cheese (the stuff you shake out of can) parsley garlic and just a smite of italian dressing to create a italian flavor. Other nights I mix spicey pepper powder, cilatro, little bit of salt of course and add a bit of lime when it's cooked for a mexican flavor. Most times though I just open my cabinent and say HM what looks good. Tonight I had Pepper, Roasted Garlic and Herb, and spicy pepper powder.

That's the sheer joy of making it this way to, you don't always have to end up cooking the same thing over.

Here is a recipie that I feel is dying out because it's really only a one state recipe.

Booyah

4 Ham bones (some use beef)
1 1/2 lb beef stew meat, cut into 1 inch cubes (not going to kill it if you don't have it)
2 cups approx. of pearl onions
5 ribs of celery, chopped (you can leave this out many people do)
1 whole chicken, cut into pieces
2 bay leaves
1/2 tbsp salt
1/2 tbsp cracked black pepper
5 large carrots, trimmed, chopped
2 cups of green cabbage, shredded
2 cups of fresh green beans, chopped
4 large tomatoes, chopped
2 cups of corn kernels
1 cup of peas
10 red potatoes, skin on, chopped
1 large lemon, juiced
1/2 tbsp worchestershire sauce (optional more current add-if you used ham probably not)
1 tbsp soy sauce (same as above you don't NEED it-again ham probably not)
12c Water
Chopped flat leaf parsley

In a large (make sure it can easly handle 12 cups and leave some room above the rim do not make my mistake) soup pot put in your bones and start to brown them over medium high heat should only take a few minutes. Add HALF the onions and your bay leaves stir for about a minute then time to add the water. YAY! Add a pinch of salt and pepper and bring to a boil. Add in the stew meat and the chicken peices, then simmer for two hours. If your meat is not covered then you should add a little bit more water. As the meat boils skim off the sh-t that floats to the top.

Two hours is up remove all the meat, and just the meat and skim off any thing that has floated to the top. Leave in the bones though. Add your patatoes and carrots for about 15 minutes. Me personally I like to do carrots 15 patatoes 10. Then toss in your peas, carrots and green beans for cook for about 10 minutes then add the tomatoes season with a bit more salt and pepper cover and simmer for about another 10 minutes as you begin to deskin and pull the chicken meat off the bone.

Add the meat back to the pot and give it a good stir continue covered on low heat for 30 minutes. After time is up add the lemon juice and if you so desire whoreshiresauce and soy sauce. You also want to add yoru cabbiage here give it a good stir and let it stnad five minutes off heat (covered) then serve. Well, most don't like to add cabbage that late but where i am from that's what we do because we don't like mushy gooshy cabbiage. You can remove the bones now, again some people do some people don't.

It's a Wisconsin reciepe and over the years people keep mixing up what is in it. Anyway as you can tell it's a recipie to feed and army. Some people add a can of beer that's okay same with hot sauce. :-) It's rare to see two people make Booyah the same.

Disclaimer: I am just being a goof ball, please ignore me if offended.
Lab Assistant
#63 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 6:10 PM
Spaghetti and meatballs w/ garlic bread.

Been downloading like crazy...so many great creators here! Neglecting forums...will be back soon...ish.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#64 Old 2nd Feb 2012 at 11:09 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrowningFishy
...It's a Wisconsin reciepe and over the years people keep mixing up what is in it. Anyway as you can tell it's a recipie to feed and army. Some people add a can of beer that's okay same with hot sauce. :-) It's rare to see two people make Booyah the same.
That's one meaty recipe, so I probably won't be making it in the near future, but it was interesting to learn about. I found this definition on Wikipedia:

"Booya or booyah is a thick soup of unknown origin made throughout the Upper Midwestern United States.[1] Booya often requires up to two days and multiple cooks to prepare; it is cooked in specially designed "booya kettles" and usually meant to serve hundreds or even thousands of people. The name also refers to the event surrounding the meal. Alternative spellings include bouja, boulyaw, and bouyou."

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
Scholar
#65 Old 3rd Feb 2012 at 1:11 AM Last edited by DrowningFishy : 3rd Feb 2012 at 3:55 AM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by VerDeTerre
That's one meaty recipe, so I probably won't be making it in the near future, but it was interesting to learn about. I found this definition on Wikipedia:

"Booya or booyah is a thick soup of unknown origin made throughout the Upper Midwestern United States.[1] Booya often requires up to two days and multiple cooks to prepare; it is cooked in specially designed "booya kettles" and usually meant to serve hundreds or even thousands of people. The name also refers to the event surrounding the meal. Alternative spellings include bouja, boulyaw, and bouyou."


Yes there is long ways to make booyah. But this is the short way. XD As for it's orgin well I was only told it was because of the Belgin, German, Polish, Welch, and Irish puttinng together in a pot what they had. LOL which is probably another reason why the reciepe keeps changing but the general basis is there. Great soup for cold blistery months.

Bouyah kettle never herd of that. But I know of people who take a giant ol' pot out side and cook booyah over an open fire for several hours (God it's the best like that).

Okay I shut up now, I'm making myself hungry.

Disclaimer: I am just being a goof ball, please ignore me if offended.
Mad Poster
#66 Old 3rd Feb 2012 at 1:12 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DrowningFishy
Okay I shut up now, I'm making myself hungry.


BOOOOOOYAAAH!

I'm a graduate of the Harvard business school. I travel quite extensively. I lived through the Black Plague and had a pretty good time during that. I've seen the EXORCIST ABOUT A HUNDRED AND SIXTY-SEVEN TIMES, AND IT KEEPS GETTING FUNNIER EVERY SINGLE TIME I SEE IT.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#67 Old 3rd Feb 2012 at 1:15 AM
Tonight's dinner, quick and light (since I slept this afternoon and wasn't up for a big meal nor cooking lots): plain yogurt, frozen raspberries, and maple syrup.

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
The Great AntiJen
staff: moderator
#68 Old 3rd Feb 2012 at 11:25 AM
Giggle - love the spellings of Worcestershire there Drowning, especially this one: whoreshiresauce

Amused me anyway.

Tonight we're just going to have garlic and mushrooms, probably on toast. I love mushrooms - possibly my favourite thing.

Polgannon: Who Murdered Blaise Penhaligan?
(3rd ed. neighbourhood now available with corrections). Poll: http://strawpoll.me/6689876

Polls: length of neighbourhood play: http://www.strawpoll.me/10908815 & http://www.strawpoll.me/10908842

Thread for yakking about making TS2 stuff
Scholar
#69 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 4:19 AM
Oh, that food-blog looks wonderful opiumgirl, and with so many different types of dishes!
Thank you for the recipes Spitfire Mouse, VerDe Terre, and DrowningFishy; haven't actually tried (or even really heard of, honestly) booyah, but it sounds interesting.
Lab Assistant
#70 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 4:30 AM
bosco pizza sticks, stick them in the oven for 14 mins, ta-da dinner is served.

is proud not to be a fracking idiot

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Test Subject
#71 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 4:49 AM
@opiumgirl: I totally bookmarked that page.

I'm a terrible cook. My fresh hash browns come out like glue, and I make evil out of ramen. I once thought it would be a good idea to put red wine vinegar in my ramen...I recommend never, ever doing that unless you're already bulimic. Once I made 'breakfast ramen'...okay, I actually thought that tasted good, but I have the worst palate in the world.
HAaaaaa ummm here's the recipe:

Top Ramen
some eggs
some cheddar cheese
a couple of those pre-shaped, frozen hash browns (like the kind they cook at McDonald's)
some sausage and/or ham
and the secret ingredient: ketchup!

Directions: you just boil some water, throw everything in except for the cheese and ketchup. When the noodles or the hash browns are done, top with ketchup and cheese, stir it all together...ENJOY!

My boyfriend hated me for that. I am never allowed to cook!
Luckily he does an awesome job, especially when it comes to Asian cooking. He makes a lot of hot and sour soup, stir-fry, teriyaki chicken (etc.) and he smokes ribs n' bakes them (we have a somewhat limited kitchen). Also, he makes a holy steak. Holy are his sauces, too.
I'm hungry.
Test Subject
#72 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 5:47 AM
Actually...anyone have any tips for cooking fresh-grated potatoes?
Scholar
#73 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 7:19 AM Last edited by DrowningFishy : 4th Feb 2012 at 7:34 AM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by quayse
Actually...anyone have any tips for cooking fresh-grated potatoes?


Squeeze out as much moister as you can, heat thin layer of oil or butter in a pan. Spread them out in a thin layer and make hash browns.

or you can grate 1lbs about of pataters squeeze out moister as above add egg, dried onion flake, salt, pepper, and nutmeg (to taste usually apinch or two). Use a half cup to scoop up mixture flatten on hot frying pan. Fry as above and you have german patater pancakes.

-Edit- to the german patater pancake you can add half of a large fresh onion chopped if you want to use fresh onion instead.


Patater=patato sorry bad habit.

(you can squeeze out moister in a garlic masher or squeeze out in a towel.)

Disclaimer: I am just being a goof ball, please ignore me if offended.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#74 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 10:01 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by quayse
Actually...anyone have any tips for cooking fresh-grated potatoes?
As Drowny said, you can make German potato pancakes (or latkes , a traditional Hanukkah dish, they are the same thing, really.) But my question to you is why did you grate them in the first place?

For reasons of health and convenience, when I hanker for potatoes, I typically do this:
Scrub potatoes, but leave the skin on. Pierce the skins in a few spots with a fork.
Microwave them in a casserole dish in short bursts (2 to 3 minutes at a time) turning and checking that they cook evenly.
Once cooked, cut them into cubes, drizzle with olive oil, grate fresh pepper over them and salt. (Sometimes I melt cubed cheese over them in the microwave afterwards.)

They are delicious this way and satisfy all potato related cravings I may have. Occasionally we make home fries by precooking them slightly (I use the microwave), cutting them into cubes, frying them slowly in a cast iron pan with onions and olive oil, season them when soft with paprika and pepper.

Olive oil is healthier than most other oils. Limiting oil overall is considered a good practice for health. I leave potato skins on because I don't want to bother with taking them off and because that's where the flavor and the vitamins are. However, it's important to remove any green that you see and that may lie just under the first layer of skin. This is especially true of yellow potatoes. The green shows that the potato has been exposed to light and has produced chlorophyll. Green potato skins and potato leaves contain traces of solanine that can harm you over time. This is probably why people started peeling potatoes in the first place, but if you just remove the green parts, the rest of the potato and any non-green parts are fine. Here's a link to a picture of what the green skin typically looks like beneath the first brown layer.

Addicted to The Sims since 2000.
Top Secret Researcher
#75 Old 4th Feb 2012 at 10:22 AM
Well first I thought I would make Moussaka, but then I realised that was too much work so I thought I would make cottage pie with eggplant in it, but that was too much work so I thought I would make the sauce and have mashed potato on the side, but that was too much work so I decided to make the sauce with potatoes on the side. And I did, and it was so delicious!
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