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Field Researcher
Original Poster
#1 Old 12th Apr 2012 at 8:55 PM
Default Legacies: How to not grow attached?
I keep being tempted to try a legacy game from all the way back to the beginning (Sims 2?) but I've never done it.

I usually make Sims based off of characters in my head, and I always try to make their lives great (except for maybe story plot points).

However legacy stuff you don't stick with just one character and aging is supposed to happen..

So I'm trying to figure out how a person who gets attached to characters can have fun trying something that requires less attachment.

Any ideas?
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Mad Poster
#2 Old 12th Apr 2012 at 9:01 PM
What I usually do is create my characters but don't extensively plan out their lives. Have THEM live it out and experience it for better or for worse. Just accept that when they reach elderhood, you're going to be focussing more on their children, and just let them slip into the periphery a bit if you tend to get really emotional over that. Or, alternatively, you can do the extreme opposite: have them go out with a bang. Do everything you want to do with them before they die and have them throw a MASSIVE party on the eve of their death.


"It's a royal pain in the ass, I know, but it turns out most 11-year-old girls don't know jack shit about managing hangovers." - MinghamSmith
Angie/DS | Baby Sterling - 24/2/2014
Quite possibly the owner of the largest TS2 downloads folder on this site. Last count: 75 GB
Theorist
#3 Old 12th Apr 2012 at 9:40 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by DigitalSympathies
have them throw a MASSIVE party on the eve of their death.
Wah! This is not helping me, DigitalSympathies!
Scholar
#4 Old 12th Apr 2012 at 11:17 PM
I have been playing legacies since TS2 pre first EP because life spans were the main selling point for me on the game. I find that getting attached to characters is VERY important in playing a legacy. Otherwise, it gets really boring because it will eventually become tedious and feel very repetitive if you don't build up an attachment to the characters or allow them to have a story around them. I will toss out 4/5 legacies I make because I don't get attached enough to the family to stick with it. But the ones that I keep for a long time, I get really attached to on one level. There are some long dead and gone sims that I will never ever forget and I still get a little misty about them.

HOWEVER, I think a level of detachment is important. If you make a sim that you have too much emotional investment in, you won't allow them to make mistakes or let them suffer. A too perfect legacy will get boring fast. Here are some things I do and have done in the past.

1. Do NOT make a simself. If you have a problem with detaching from your characters to the point where you won't let them age, don't go there. You won't want to see yourself flirt with the really ugly pizza dude with the mullet. You won't want to watch yourself get electrocuted or get fired from your job. And of course, almost nobody wants to watch their simself die of old age. You need to have a sim that it doesn't feel like a personal insult when they get snubbed by other sims - or instead of cringing in terror when you see their wives cheating on them, you're snickering in glee.

SO -- instead of making a simself, or a sim based on your crush or someone you admire, base a sim on someone you really dislike. My first very successful TS3 guy was based off of someone I knew from playing DnD and one of the most annoying guys I ever met. Basically, he was like the comic book guy in the Simpsons, but had a less charming personality. I made a sim that looked like him the best I could and then I gave him the 5 traits that really annoyed me the most about him. I LOVED watching him suffer and if something went wrong, it made me laugh, and I was never tempted to fix things or make it easier for him.

2. Don't over-control. Let stuff happen. No matter how bad of a mess, just go with it rather than trying to fix it. My first run with Comic Book Guy had a funny built in story. He fell in love with this hideously ugly randomly made townie coworker that Awesome Mod spit out for him. She was almost as obnoxious as he was with her traits, her randomly selected haircut and outfit was horrible and she had a really goofy looking face. But for whatever reason, he spontaneously wanted to flirt with her. She turned out to be married. So she broke up with him, but when my sim married her, it turned out that she had three kids! So there was this plotline going on about how she abandoned her husband and kids to be with my guy. I ended up inviting them over to all the parties. I could tell you so many stories about the drama between the ex husband, but I won't. When he died, I put him on the lot with the rest of the family because he cracked me up even though he was just an NPC.

3. Go random with the kid's traits. This way, they won't be too perfect and you may pick jobs or hobbies that you normally never pick, but their traits call for it. I also allow random kid's outfits. I had a toddler age up into a pink tuxedo and get the evil trait when he turned into a child. Seeing him in the little pink suit with the evil laugh made his character. Pink became his signature color, and he always wore a tuxedo if I could have him get away with it. When he grew up he wanted to be a children's book illustrator -- an EVIL children's book illustrator, of course. I couldn't have dreamed up that character on my own, but the randomness made him.

4. Even if you don't write out your legacy, narrate it in your head -- or if you are alone, talk out loud. If they have stupid routing problems or things that annoy you, work them into their narration and start seeing them as character quirks rather than annoying "features" EA added. This helps you automatically make stories about your sims without really trying. It also gives you the feeling that these are characters in a book rather than your friends. If they die or have bad things happen, that's just the plot of the book. You're not the sim god -- you're just helping the characters make the story and they need your help doing things that they can't do autonomously.

5. The party thing is better than you might think. In TS2, because of a rule that said you couldn't move the tombstones when they died until you unlocked a certain career, I wanted to make sure that my sims died way out on the corner of the lot. So I made this huge party way back in the corner. They were all standing in the snow. The teens - elders were all freestyling and the kids were blowing bubbles. There was NOTHING more hilarious than when that guy died and suddenly all of the freestyle rapping turned into those loud annoying screams they would sometimes do in TS2. What made it funnier was that the sims couldn't just instantly stop freestyling, but they had to go until a stopping point. So there was one guy still rapping and dancing around happily for a minute or so while everyone else was sobbing. Then it turned out that he didn't like the guy very much so he just shrugged and walked back into the house. I loved that guy, but his death always makes me smile.


Sorry if this is TLDR, but I love legacies and I think that there is a way to be attached enough to stay interested, but detached enough not to want to micromanage them. That's the secret of Legacies.
Field Researcher
#5 Old 12th Apr 2012 at 11:21 PM
I don't play a "legacy game" per se, and I don't play the legacy challenge but I pretty much only play legacy-type families -- I can't get into the game at all without investing myself in the families. At this point in my Bridgeport neighborhood, pretty much everyone has intermarried so many times that everybody is a tiny bit related. I have multiple legacy families going at one time -- I'm hard pressed to think of any families that aren't, at a minimum, five or six generations old.
Field Researcher
#6 Old 14th Apr 2012 at 10:01 AM
What kewpiw said, basically. The best Legacy characters since the dawn of legacies (Pinstar and TS2) are two kinds: Either extremely (well) written, character that have a personality even before CAS, OR completely random characters who "make themselves". I still remember my favourite TS2 legacy to read (Legacy family by Jfed), where the founder was the only person to have type 1 personality, and the rest just followed. It was grand and awesome, and it would have not been that good if they just lived forever. Just like in real life, the moments are more meaningful and precious since sim-life is limited.
Mad Poster
#7 Old 15th Apr 2012 at 8:57 PM
I can't play legacies. I even don't like to play second generation families. I make characters that I want to play and "fall in love" with them and then want them to live forever. Their children are rarely of interest to me.
Scholar
#8 Old 16th Apr 2012 at 12:07 AM
Start with one of the pre-mades in a pre-made house. At least you won't be emotionally involved at the start.

This is why we can never have nice things!
Lab Assistant
#9 Old 6th May 2012 at 9:13 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by kewpie
1. Do NOT make a simself. If you have a problem with detaching from your characters to the point where you won't let them age, don't go there. You won't want to see yourself flirt with the really ugly pizza dude with the mullet. You won't want to watch yourself get electrocuted or get fired from your job. And of course, almost nobody wants to watch their simself die of old age. You need to have a sim that it doesn't feel like a personal insult when they get snubbed by other sims - or instead of cringing in terror when you see their wives cheating on them, you're snickering in glee.

SO -- instead of making a simself, or a sim based on your crush or someone you admire, base a sim on someone you really dislike. My first very successful TS3 guy was based off of someone I knew from playing DnD and one of the most annoying guys I ever met. Basically, he was like the comic book guy in the Simpsons, but had a less charming personality. I made a sim that looked like him the best I could and then I gave him the 5 traits that really annoyed me the most about him. I LOVED watching him suffer and if something went wrong, it made me laugh, and I was never tempted to fix things or make it easier for him.



This has to be the bestest advice on the subject I have found. I keep a simself...but she is usually the NARRATOR, and not a major player. And of course, she lives forever.
Destroyer of Worlds
staff: moderator
#10 Old 6th May 2012 at 9:29 PM
I used to be just like this...never could make it past a certain stage (generally generation 1) because I got invested in their lives and planned everything out. When I played TS2, I rotated families and always had it worked out who was friends with who, who would marry this guy or that girl, etc. I spent more time planning than playing though I think. I started a legacy and have been doing pretty well this time around. I'm in generation 4 and do a lot of the things kewpie suggested. Random traits which help come up with the character. In generation 1, there was a free vacation glitch that made the mother disappear forever. Instead of starting over, I wrote it in. To this day, no one knows what happened to her because she just abandoned her family. I try to make my sims have real life flaws too. No one can be perfect and no one can have a perfectly happy life.

Heaven Sims | Avendale Legacy
"On the internet, you can be anything you want. It's strange that so many people choose to be stupid."
Field Researcher
#11 Old 6th May 2012 at 9:51 PM
I never play legacies, because I want to switch between different families and take a TOTAL CONTROL over everyone in my town, and because, if you play a legacy, you have to grow many generations of the sims. It seems stupid to me, because you can hardly make it look like the time changes. It takes about 100 years IRL for 5 generations to pass. Just think how much has changed in the world for the last century! The technical progress, the clothes, the lifestyles... And, as civilization is developing faster and faster, we don't even know how it will look in one more century. However, in sims, you can play even ten generations and it still looks like they're living in the same period. The same clothes on townies, the same jobs, the same appliances and transport (who got to work in carpools, took those yellow taxies, or went to school by bus 100 years ago! And who had computers, stereos and TVs? People couldn't even imagine that such things could ever exist). Thus, the realism is completely lost. Makes no sence for me.
And one more reason why I don't play legacies: my most interesting characters are childless. I dislike children IRL, I also notice that most people I like and consider interesting personalities, don't have them, and are not interested in them, too. My sims with less bright personalities, but good genetics (GOOD GENETICS is vital here! Those sims should not only be pretty, but look good as opposite gender, too) procreate... because somehow the sim civilization has to survive, right? as well as human civilization... I chose epic lifespan, and sometimes change my sims back to younger age, if I feel that I've not played them enough as teens or YA. So, I hardly ever go past 2nd generation.

In the end, it's your game. Try to play a legacy if you want, to decide whether it's for you or not, and do whatever you please with your simmies
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