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#26 Old 7th Aug 2013 at 10:57 PM
Woah, it looks foreign in a way.. Like a mixture of south of France, Brighton pavilion and something Moorish... Is it still inhabited by royalty today?
I must add it to my to-visit list!

Anyway, probably my last visit to a historical building this holiday, I went to Jeronimos Monastery, where nearby is the Statue of Liberty, the Sydney Opera house of Lisbon, The Belem tower. I went into the marine museum next door, it was fascinating, it had a nice section on the decolonisation era, yay! (And a world map from the 1600s)

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#27 Old 8th Aug 2013 at 12:09 PM
That's because Osborne House is one of the first/earliest Italianate style homes of the Victorian era. I don't believe it's still inhabbited. It's just a museum really nowadays. It does still have its original elevator though. It's quite impressive to see although they don't use it much anymore.
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#28 Old 8th Aug 2013 at 10:49 PM
Ooh, well it looks amazing. The queen don't know what she's missing out on! It actually looks liveable compared to some palaces I've seen... Maybe a project to take on when I consider myself worty (on sims)

I guess it being an early itslianate is important?

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#29 Old 17th Aug 2013 at 9:41 PM
Well, Italianate was one of the key Victorian styles, although it wasn't nearly as popular over here as it was in the USA. But it's a style that is usually associated with America, even though it started over here and was inspired by Italian architecture. Well the Queen can't live at Osborne because she doesn't own it. We do, or rather the state owns it.
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#30 Old 19th Aug 2013 at 9:21 AM
Oh ok, I'm not hot on which styles are which really, it's not my strong point. All I know is about what is nice, and what is beautiful.

So queen Victoria gave it to the state in her death, or was it one of her descendants?

There isn't that much in the way of historic buildings round here, except if you count the well and the church. But there used to be an estate here, but I think a fire destroyed it in the 1950s… the gate lodge is still fully intact. There's now an ambulance centre, my primary school, the playing field and a 70s or 80s housing estate... Shame really. But you guess things happen…

But back to favourite historic places. I'm not sure.

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#31 Old 19th Aug 2013 at 11:31 AM Last edited by Fergie_F : 19th Aug 2013 at 12:14 PM.
A gatehouse? Ooh, sounds interesting, and yet the fate that fell upon the main house was all too common, it's a shame really.
Queen Victoria left it to her children, but they didn't want it, so her eldest son; King Edward, gave it to the state with in a year of her death.
There's another wonderfully creepy and beautiful old house near me, it's on a street of terraces and really stands out, you can see it here. There's a house of an almost identical design further along the street, although it has been modernised.
Another old house I've just thought about is Moot Hall, on the seafront in Clacton-On-Sea, Essex:

It was built in the 1920s/1930s although it looks much older because it was built out of a much older Tudor/Elizabethan home that was being demolished.
Staying in Clacton, The Royal Hotel is another of my favourite historic places.

It was affectionately known as "Big Blue" and featured on the tv show "The Hotel Inspector" as it was being restored to its former grandeur as a hotel, although it was never finished and looks quite sorry for itself on Clacton's seafront.
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#32 Old 21st Aug 2013 at 8:15 PM
Oh right... Yeah, I know between 1930 and 1980 Thousands of Country homes were demolished… Often replaced by a load of ugly, bleak newbuilds.


Talking about Clacton and homes, my Nan Really likes the look of 2 homes on EastCliff Ave/Third Ave, One on Holland Road and one in Holland-on-sea (not intirely sure where)

Yeah, the gatehouse was built in "1889 AD, its above the door and is right next to a Dual Carriageway near my school, and there's some "Listed Trees" which can't be chopped… So there's lots of evidence dor an old estate.

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#33 Old 22nd Aug 2013 at 11:28 AM
I really like the Garden District in Clacton, it has the posh avenues Frinton has, without the huge price tags, and some of the houses are still really nice an original, I've seen some for sale that still have their original 1920s/1930s/1940s bathrooms and kitchens. They're really something quite special. It was really distracting learning to drive there when I was constantly surrounded by nice old houses, and then the locals have no road safety sense, so they just step out in front of moving cars, expecting them to stop. It really keeps you on your toes.

Oh the joys of listed trees... Some I've seen are just rotten and dangerous, but others I can understand why you wouldn't want to let them be cut down.
There's some really nice old Oak trees in a village near me; Mistley:

One of them is known as "Old Knobbley", we have a similar one in our garden, but we have a swing hanging from it. It's really quite special, especially on a warm summers day/evening.
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#34 Old 22nd Aug 2013 at 5:12 PM
Yeah, my old Year 6 (Grade 5 for North Americans) Teacher told us about it, since she was born in the area... She passed away the december after I left... Alas.

These are really tall trees, definately not oaks, and they are all lined in a row...

There is this old Asylum, which was left disused in the late 70s, after being used for around 80 years.
NOw there's a High-Security Prison on the site...
Less than a mile from my house!

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#35 Old 23rd Aug 2013 at 11:23 AM
We have an old mental asylum in Colchester; Severall's:


It's a huge and beautiful old site although it's in severe disrepair, it's only a matter of time before mother nature takes it away. It's a shame really as the whole place was very interesting in its heyday, if you can call it that. It was entirely self sufficient, if it was still in a good state of repair and the fences were all secure it would be the perfect shelter in a zombie appocalypse; a grand old building providing shelter and safety as well as fresh food, clean water and electricity, completely independent of the outside world. I probably watch too much of The Walking Dead...
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#36 Old 26th Aug 2013 at 5:34 PM
Woah, (I use that word a lot don't I?) It looks like it's been stricken by a zombie apocalypse itself or something out of Life After Humans We need more self-suffiecient structure, maybe I could make something self sufficient, one day, when I'm older, and rich enough. I guess it'll be in sims until then,

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#37 Old 26th Aug 2013 at 6:16 PM
I plan on owning a large historic home one day, I'd like to make it energy efficient (with proper insulation and having existing windows altered to make them double-glazed rather than replacing them completely), and then make the house almost entirely self-sustainable. My best friend is going of to Cambridge University to study engineering. Then he could use my old house as a flag-ship for his renewable energy projects. I'd also like to make it "zombie proof", just incase
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#38 Old 26th Aug 2013 at 6:32 PM
^you can double glaze preexisting windows?
I'd GOD FORBID love to have lots of Solar Panels on my house, but I'd do it Artfully, not like, Yeah, just splash some solar panels here, a solarPanels there, oops just made a character full house a nightmare!

Really, I probably wouldn't make my main house, a historic one, maybe my hsecond home, or something. As much as I like historic buildings, I like a modern, open way of life, because, if I was going to restore, I'd do it very faithfully. Plus, if like the challenge of designing my house from the ground up.

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#39 Old 27th Aug 2013 at 7:00 PM
It's very rare to see existing single-glazed windows double-glazed as it can involve taking the whole frame apart, so you loose the decades/centuries of paint that accumulates, hence why it is never approved for listed buildings and is more expensive than just replacing them altogether, which is the choice for unlisted buildings. If the building is listed then you can have a second layer of glazing/windows built on the internal side of the existing windows, although this isn't generally favoured as it can be very ugly and the orignal windows on the outside often get neglected. The other option is to do as the Americans do and fit storm windows for the winter months, which is basically an external version of the previous option.

As for renewable energy, it's not just solar panels, with further developement wind turbines could be better. A renewable source of hot water can come from running the water through pipes stretching out under the ground. My neighbours have them installed for the house at the top of our lane which they are fixing up. basically they had to dig a bunch of trenches going through the garden and bury a bunch of pipes in them. Then the ground will somehow heat the water.

I'd love to have a big old house as my main home. I'd have a big one with a good amount of land, and with a few outbuildings and cottages too. That way I can have some beautiful traditional gardens with a greenhouse/orangery and walled garden. Then I can open them to the public when they are at their best and maybe have like a little cafe in the grounds or something. I'd then rent out the cottages/gate lodge and rent out the larger formal rooms in the house for events such as conferences and weddings. Then the house could make the money for its own upkeep as well as the energy to run it. I just know that if I have any children, they wont have the enthusiasm for history and old buildings that I do, so money will be the thing that is needed to persuade them to keep my dream going after I am gone. God knows how I am going to make the money to buy such a house in the first place...
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#40 Old 27th Aug 2013 at 11:11 PM
Wind turbines? I'm not going to do what they did off the Clacton Coastline, jees "Bloody Eyesores" - that's what my grandad calls them… And how would I get them small enough to be like, idk, normalish? I'm not having a blooming 50m white pole stuck at the end of my garden, killing pidgeons and bats left right and centre!

Oh and Geothermal? I didn't think essex was... Volcanic? Enough for that, they are only employed in Cornwall in the UK!

To Quote Abba, as I frenquently do, on Twitter "Money Money Money, always funny, in a rich man's world"

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#41 Old 7th Sep 2013 at 7:29 PM
It's not geothermal, I don't know what it is, but the pipes are only run about a foot or two below the surface.
But anyway, I've thought of another historical place that might be of interest:
The Ancient House, Ipswich, Suffolk

This is one seriously old girl that still sports her Tudor/Medieval finery. She dates back to the 15th Century(1400s) and is very lucky to still be standing. She had to endure very little 'Georgianisation' and 'Victorianisation'. But by the 1970s it was looking like she wouldn't be standing for much longer, she's is one of the key buildings in Ipswish's Buttermarket and that part of town would look very different without her. Her pargeting is simply stunning and she is well worth a visit; original built as a merchant's house, the pargeting displays Tudor impressions of the continents Asia, Africa, America and Europe, but now she is a shop. So you are able to go in and explore the many rooms she has, all packed with features from all the periods that this grand ol' girl has seen. I always go in and see her when I'm in Ipswich. I very rarely buy anything from the actual shop, but I just wonder around and admire the place for what it is and the history it has.

If you ever find yourself in Suffolk, Ipswich is well worth a visit, there are so many beautiful historical places to see, my list could go on and on...
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#42 Old 21st Dec 2013 at 9:30 PM Last edited by Fergus' Mind : 21st Dec 2013 at 9:42 PM.
Prospect Cottage, Dungeness, Kent


I like Dungeness because when you think of England, you don't think of deserts, but surprisingly, it does have a desert; Dungeness, on the coast of Kent. Prospect Cottage is very popular with artists, which is very understandable when you see its setting and its garden. it's also one of the few cottages there that wasn't originally an old railway carraige. There are quite a few other historical buildings in Dungeness such as the lighthouses and various other cottages that are formed from old railway carriages. And then there's the nuclear powerplant, which oddly enough, doesn't look out of place.
I've gathered a selection of images to illustrate just how odd a place Dungeness is:
(Be warned, there's quite a lot...)
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#43 Old 24th Feb 2014 at 8:56 PM
The Carson Mansion, Eureka, CA

A very famous west-coast Victorian home; you can see many interior pictures and read a bit about its history here.
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#44 Old 10th Apr 2014 at 8:08 PM
Amsterdam, The Netherlands

The whole city seemed to be packed with great historic architecture around every corner. I completely fell in love with it. Apart from avoiding murderous cyclists and trams I really enjoyed just walking around the streets admiring all the buildings, canals and sights. One of my favourite buildings had to be the Palace/City Hall, as pictured above. The reality of the city isn't what its reputation would have you believe.
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#45 Old 22nd May 2014 at 8:05 PM
oooooh. I wanna go see Hatley Castle!







edited to add: I found some floor plans. I might try to make this if I can fit it in a 64x64 lot....

sooooooo bewteeeful
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#46 Old 23rd May 2014 at 11:18 AM
Wow, built in 1908 it's not what you'd usually expect to find in BC, Canada, but wow, it's gorgeous. I remember seeing/reading about it before somewhere. It kind of reminds me of somewhere I visited in the west coast of Scotland.
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#47 Old 23rd May 2014 at 4:06 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Fergus' Mind
Wow, built in 1908 it's not what you'd usually expect to find in BC, Canada, but wow, it's gorgeous. I remember seeing/reading about it before somewhere. It kind of reminds me of somewhere I visited in the west coast of Scotland.


I agree. It's got something old world about it. I think that's why I love it so much.

Out here in the west, we don't expect to find something like this, especially something built in the 1900s!

James Dunsmuir is a Scottish name, I think, so his ancestors were probably Scots.
The architect was Samuel Maclure, another Canadian. but Maclure looks like another Scottish name to me. Dunno.

Mostly, what I know of Scotland is what I see googling, and what I saw watching Monarch of the Glen:
the countryside is awe-inspiring; the castles are stunning; and that accent is dreamy, very sexy.
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#48 Old 24th May 2014 at 7:55 AM Last edited by r_deNoube : 24th May 2014 at 8:07 AM.
Quote:
Originally Posted by tsyokawe
Out here in the west, we don't expect to find something like this, especially something built in the 1900s!

It's on Vancouver Island, which has a distinctly British feel to it. Originally it was a separate colony from mainland British Columbia, though now Victoria is the provincial capital. (Isn't that a lovely name for a provincial capital? But it entails a ferry ride to get to the capital from the largest city.)

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsyokawe
James Dunsmuir is a Scottish name, I think, so his ancestors were probably Scots.
The architect was Samuel Maclure, another Canadian. but Maclure looks like another Scottish name to me. Dunno.

There are loads and loads of Scottish Canadians. I believe the same Dunsmuir family are responsible for some other famous buildings: Robert (father of James) caused Craigdarroch Castle (also near Victoria), and Alexander (another son of Robert) had this neoclassical revival house built in Oakland (California):

Quote:
Originally Posted by tsyokawe
Mostly, what I know of Scotland is what I see googling, and what I saw watching Monarch of the Glen:
the countryside is awe-inspiring; the castles are stunning; and that accent is dreamy, very sexy.

One side of my ancestors come from there but I have never been, yet. I agree about the accent! And there's music.

EDIT: as to Maclure, the name can be Scottish or Irish, and if Scottish, those Maclures are affiliated with Clan MacLeod. Trivia: MacLeod is the name I'll use in a future issue of a Comic, being a flashback to the 19th century American prairie. (It is a pun. MacLeod is pronounced, and in America sometimes spelt, McCloud -- which means the same as de Noube. So Janet will get to play her possible ancestor Jennie MacLeod.)
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#49 Old 24th May 2014 at 2:44 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by r_deNoube
And there's music.

EDIT: as to Maclure, the name can be Scottish or Irish, and if Scottish, those Maclures are affiliated with Clan MacLeod. Trivia: MacLeod is the name I'll use in a future issue of a Comic, being a flashback to the 19th century American prairie. (It is a pun. MacLeod is pronounced, and in America sometimes spelt, McCloud -- which means the same as de Noube. So Janet will get to play her possible ancestor Jennie MacLeod.)


Bagpipes. I love bagpipes. I love fiddles and woodwinds, too. So, it's possible that I like traditional Scots music...

My best to Janet. I hope she isn't stuck wearing a corset.
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#50 Old 24th May 2014 at 11:51 PM
Going off topic; a big part of my family is Scottish, and I've spent many summers, springs, autumns and winters in various parts of Scotland. I must say that it's true what they say about Scotland in that once you've seen one part of it; you've seen all of it. While it is undeniably a beautiful landscape, one place is very much like the rest, depending on where you are. The accent on the other hand can be a novelty which wares off. When Scots get excited the rate at which they speak can increase dramatically making it difficult to distinguish what they are actually saying. But when it comes to architecture; they really know what they're doing; the average proportions of a Scottish home are far grander than their English relatives, even that of the lower classes during the Industrial Revolution. However; the city of Glasgow recently lost one of its most iconic buildings:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-scotla...w-west-27556659

The Glasgow School of Art.

Going back to the Scottish-Canadian theme; there's the very gorgeous Scottish Rite Club in Hamilton, OT
 
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