Replies: 7 (Who?), Viewed: 7112 times.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#1 Old 18th Jun 2018 at 4:29 AM
Default Favorite Authors?
For those that want to reply, feel free to offer as little or much information you would like about your favorite authors. I know what kind of books I like to read, but I tend to stick with what I know. I'm looking to expand my horizons as it were.

Sadly, I'm not bilingual ( I'm a bit envious of those that are...) so please keep this in mind.

~ You need StarWars TRADEMARK Journey to Baboo for My First Pet Stuff because your hamster can be a Jedi~
I stole this line from a YT video comment. Cheers to the person that said it.
Advertisement
Scholar
#2 Old 20th Jun 2018 at 12:39 AM
Off the top of my head: Agatha Christie because Poirot is rad yo, John le Carré because espionnage

I clearly usually go for the murder mystery thriller, but not the gross kind cos that's just nasty. Fantasy is nice too, but it can't drone on and on (no book should do that). Also books where "nothing" happens or where romance is suddenly intorduced and becomes the main focus are the worst. Like who does that to a person?

What do you like to read?
Mad Poster
#3 Old 20th Jun 2018 at 1:06 AM
I usually read trivia and small articles compiled on yearly basis of standout, outrageously strange and bizarre articles like a court case where two men both named Peter Maxwell were suing each other for damages for giant industrial baking equipment one of them dented. They settled out of court.

So, I commend the contributions from the Bathroom Reader's Institute for the Uncle John's Bathroom Reader series. It's worth a cheap laugh and you might learn slang that correlates with a subculture or an era.

My favorite slang: Gandermooner (noun, Victorian era) refers to a man who fools around with other women a month after his wife gives birth.

Too bad I haven't found one for men who dally before the birth.

I should be the only one to shine,
I am the Golden Queen of Shadow Galactica
(Translation of a line from image song Golden Queen Galaxia)
Forum Resident
#4 Old 20th Jun 2018 at 1:28 AM
Isaac Asimov, for...everything. The man literally has works in every category of the dewey decimal system except philosophy.
Bernard Cornwell, for historical fiction. He's hysterical, and his novels are exceptionally detailed.
Wendell Berry for comfort novels and discomforting nonfiction about the plight of America.
Bill Kauffman, Joseph Pearce, and Anthony Esolen for culture and literary criticism.
Mad Poster
#5 Old 20th Jun 2018 at 1:30 AM Last edited by simmer22 : 13th Oct 2020 at 11:05 PM.
Some of my favorites and a few from books I'm currently reading or have read recently, in no particular order:
(mostly fantasy and magical crime/mystery, with a bit of dystopia and sci-fi thrown in. Some are well known authors, others less so)

- Jim Butcher (I LOVE the Dresden files! And the Codex Alera series is quite alright, too. EDIT: Started "The Aeronaut's windlass", but haven't gotten very far)
- Kevin Hearne (the "Iron Druid Chronicles" - they're in the same street as the Dresden Files, and I really like them)
- Benedict Jacka (the Alex Verus series, also reminds me of Dresden Files, and may possibly exist in the same universe in the author's head-canon...)
- JK Rowling (HP is the main reason I got into Fantasy and Sci-Fi in the first place, so while everyone and their grandmother knows of her books, she gets a mention. Her non-HP books aren't quite my taste, though. 2020 edit: Talking about the "original" JKR here, the one who seemed to be a decent person back in the days. Can't control what she's done and said over 10 years after writing the books)
- Rick Riordan (Everything. Just... Everything! They're 10+/teen/YA, but can be enjoyed by older "kids" too, particularly if you like greek/roman/norse/egyptian mythology)
- Terry Goodkind (the Sword of Truth series is one I've liked for quite some time, and the follow-up series of R&K and Children of Dhara too (I'm probably forgetting some). "Law of Nines" is a must somewhere in there, as well (for obvious reasons, especially after SoT, but also as a re-read after CoD - both makes sense...), The Nicci series was maybe a bit repetitive for my taste but beyond that it was a fun read. The Nest series was fine, too (but aybe not something I'd picked up if it didn't have his name on it). Most of his books have graphic/violent scenes, and the ideologies are a bit off the chart at times, but most of it is medieval-ish fantasy, so I guess anything goes.

- Michael Grant (Gone and Monster series, more in the teen/YA street).
- Eoin Colfer (mostly the Artemis Fowl series - they're maybe a bit in the 10+ lane, but still quite fun. Haven't read them in ages, though).
...
And tons more. By the way, I do read other things than fantasy, but I can't remember any of the authors at the moment...

(Small edit in 2020 - )
Test Subject
#6 Old 10th Dec 2019 at 8:53 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by smellincoffee
Isaac Asimov, for...everything. The man literally has works in every category of the dewey decimal system except philosophy.
Bernard Cornwell, for historical fiction. He's hysterical, and his novels are exceptionally detailed.
Wendell Berry for comfort novels and discomforting nonfiction about the plight of America.
Bill Kauffman, Joseph Pearce, and Anthony Esolen for culture and literary criticism.



I love them too
Test Subject
#7 Old 13th Oct 2020 at 6:59 PM
Hard to choose only one favorite author, I like Pratchett and Steven Erikson. Completely different styles, they both make me go through the emotional ringer in such profound ways.
Test Subject
#8 Old 13th Oct 2020 at 7:00 PM Last edited by angine : 16th Oct 2020 at 1:33 PM.
Also I like Thomas Pynchon. His writing is somehow thought-provoking, beautiful, historical, dense, hilarious, disgusting, sexual, political, and supernatural all at once. I'm wirint an essay about this author. I use a little help of writing service to write my college essays at the highest level. Hope this time they help me again.
Back to top