Replies: 13 (Who?), Viewed: 144 times.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#1 Old 3rd Apr 2021 at 2:43 PM
Default All Things Green
I've waffled for awhile now whether to start this thread or not; I'm done waffling.  I was going to go to Tumblr, but nah.  This thread is open to anybody that wants to share gardening projects, houseplant stuff, seed growing, ect...

My seedlings are in the process of being hardened off.  They're up to a hour and half out of their dome or greenhouse.  These were started from seed on 2/25/21



China Doll



Philodendron Hope
Screenshots
Advertisement
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#2 Old 4th Apr 2021 at 12:42 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 4th Apr 2021 at 6:02 PM.
It is going to be nice out today, so lots of projects are getting done, including some that were not finished last year.

We're going to finish cleaning out 'The Pit' in front of the house.  There are a few more random oak and pine trees that need to go.  It is too soon to transplant English Ivy, but at least the area will be cleaned out. Of course, there is trash clean up to be had...because people are pigs.

We have a couple of trees beyond the fence line that have developed black fungus.  These trees are sitting on town property, but they're not going to take care of it, so we'll be taking those trees down before the stuff spreads to our plants.  These trees are small, so we don't need a pro to come in and take care of this for us.

We need to finish cleaning up the sucker branches on the Weeping Cherry tree. I removed most of them, but there are a few that need something heavier than hand sheers to remove them.  Sucker branches are branches that grow from either the trunk or branch of a tree.  Tree branches are horizontal, the sucker branches grow vertically.  For the sucker branches that grow from a tree trunk, they also grow vertically, but then produce more sucker branches at the top so it looks like a tiny tree within a tree. All of this growth forces the tree to use more energy than it needs to.  Cleaning them out allows the tree to use energy where it needs to and where we want it to.

We have a bunch of random oak tree saplings growing along the north side of the property. Those are coming down, there is no reason for them to be there.

We need to finish cleaning out the garden near the street.  Like the other side of the yard, there are random oak tree saplings that need to come out.  The ones near this garden have been growing for a couple of years, so they need to chain saw to remove them. Also, more trash needs to be cleaned up because it was hidden under leaves.

I took some Japanese Andromeda runners that had rooted and planted them in a pot yesterday.  I have those cuttings downstairs with a grow light.  I ordered a timer so the lights will turn themselves off and on so I don't forget.  

After all of that is done, the leaf blower is coming out.

Inside the house, the two Pilea Peperomioides or Chinese Money Plants that came in yesterday need baths.  The leaves are supposed to be shiny. The seller sprayed something on them so they're sticky. I don't know what she used on them, but gross.  Pictured below is my new gargoyle who is smaller than that two I have outside, but he still weighs a solid 40-plus pounds as he is made from poured concrete.  He's also not pink, he's under the grow light with the Philodendron Xanadu on the right, with one of the Pilea Peperomioides that can be seen on the left. In the picture, you can see that something on the leaves that doesn't belong there.




EDIT: We got through most of this list; everybody had their own task to do which made things go faster.  The leaves may be hanging out for another day though.

Meanwhile, there is black stuff growing on the Rose of Sharons.  According to my local plant nursery, black fungus is not known to grow on Rose of Sharon, but they can't say for sure unless they can see what I was telling them about.   I'm not going to do anything with either plant until I know what the problem is, but meh regardless.  Those were planted shortly after we bought the house. The idea of losing them is not making me happy. 

I've been getting on Dingus about cleaning things like pruning sheers, ect... lately.  This is a perfect example of why said tools should always be kept clean; it prevents the spread of nasty things even though what happened in this situation has nothing to do with dirty pruning sheers.  Even trimming houseplants should always be done with clean tools and clean hands as things can be spread that way too.
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#3 Old 7th Apr 2021 at 1:42 PM
These pictures would look better if they were taken with a macro lens. I don't have one, nor do I intend to purchase one. The camera I use is a first or second generation Canon Rebel, which makes it really old. A macro lens would cost more than what my camera is worth.  If taking pictures of plants becomes a thing, I'll consider the investment at a later date.



The Lipstick plant that came in last week has settled in. I did not know the leaves on this plant have fuzz on them until I looked at the pictures in Photoshop.



This is a teeny Philodendron Xanadu shoot.  I had this plant in one spot where it sprouted a couple of new leaves, but not much of anything else. Since moving it to the new spot, I'm now seeing this kind of growth.  I can't explain it, the new area gets the same amount of light, humidity, ect...
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#4 Old 9th Apr 2021 at 4:19 PM


Oak tree leaf that isn't a leaf yet.



The forsythia is in full bloom...
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#5 Old 9th Apr 2021 at 7:32 PM
My Monstera deliciosa has been showing signs of stress. The small, lower leaves around the base of the plant have been turning yellow and dying off.   At first I thought perhaps they were not getting enough light, so I've been giving the pot a quarter turn everyday.  After a week or so of that, nothing changed.  Because the plant has doubled in size since I bought it, I decided to add organic liquid ferts at quarter strength every two weeks on top of the worm castings mixed in the soil and waited.  Small leaves still turning yellow and dying, however bigger new leaves are doing okay.

I finally got sick of watching this happen, so I decided to dig deeper and found the problem.



This is part of the soil that came from the Monstera and a few other plants that I've purchased over the past few months.  A person should not be able to make dirt mush balls that hold their shape with soil that houseplants are living in.  It doesn't dry out, roots don't get any air as when the soil does dry out, the soil becomes hard and compacted. Damp soil attracts things like fungus gnats, ( I had a few fly out at my face because they love wet soil and lay lots of eggs in it) causes things like fungus and bacterial problems, not to mention causes root rot, the number one cause of houseplants dying.

The Monstera did have some some roots that died because of the soil the plant was living in. The root rot wasn't severe and the plant will be fine as there were more healthy roots than bad ones, but I'm done with leaving plants in their original soil that they come in.  This does not mean I'm putting them in a bigger pot, it just means getting rid of the 'bad soil' and replacing it.  Up-potting plants when they don't need it also causes root rot as more soil means more moisture. I digress.

All plants are going to live in the Aroid mix that I found the recipe for. It is full of material that breaks down over time, has pumice or small lava rock to prevent the soil from compacting, it's light, and actually dries out.  The only plants I'm not going to soil swap is the Hoyas as they don't like being messed with. If they start to show signs of stress, then I'll change their soil. 

For anybody that doesn't know what fungus gnats are, they look like tiny house flies.  If you tap the side of a potted plant and there are fungus gnats, they'll come flying out.
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#6 Old 10th Apr 2021 at 5:50 PM


All of the plants I put into the new soil are very happy this morning.  My small Golden Pothos and propagated Silver Satin in particular are really happy, their leaves are sticking up in all different directions.  It is almost as if they're saying "Hallelujah!"

Sticking with the theme of making plants happy, I decided to get the China Doll and Philodendron Hope seedlings into better soil as well since they're going to be living in it anyway.  Pictured above are the Philodendron Hope seedlings that I had in two pots and combined them.  I also put them in a 2" pot so they'd spend more energy growing rather than trying to fill up the 3" pot with roots.   There is new growth coming out, so they're happy.  Allowing them to have fresh air all day and only keeping them covered at night has made a huge difference.

The next round of seeds I start, I'm starting them in smaller pots. I think they'll be better off and have stronger roots.
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#7 Old 11th Apr 2021 at 11:58 AM
Seed starting round 2.

I'm testing out a new method this time.  It involves putting seeds on damp paper towel, then putting the paper towel in a zip lock bag which is then placed in a warm area.  The bag helps maintain moisture or humidity for the seeds to sprout.  The paper towel is checked daily to make sure that it remains damp until seeds sprout. Once the seeds have sprouted roots, they are removed from the paper towel as if they are left too long, the roots stick to the paper towel making it difficult to remove them. 

From there, the seeds are transplanted into a pot and are either covered with another plastic bag, placed in a 'greenhouse' or whatever method a person decides to use to maintain humidity levels until the sprouts are ready to be hardened off.

I'm testing this with my last 2 packs of Philodendron Hope seeds. They took just over a month to sprout using the pot method.  These seeds are not known to readily sprout and can be finicky. It took just over a month before they sprouted using the pot and soil method. We'll see what happens using this method.

* I soaked the seeds overnight as recommended by the seller. Soaking them makes the outer shells softer so in theory at least, this makes seed sprouting easier.  I haven't tried this with non-finicky seeds, so I don't know how effective this is for seeds that readily spout such as sunflower seeds.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#8 Old 15th Apr 2021 at 2:05 PM


Weeping cherry tree is starting to show signs of life.  The flowers are pretty, but they don't last long.




This is the rooted runner of the Japanese Andromedia I dug up and potted a few weeks ago. (?)  I know I posted about it, but time no longer registers in my head.  Anyway,  the stem cuttings I brought in before I found out how to propagate this plant correctly didn't do much. They stayed green, but never sprouted any roots.  This new growth has appeared over the past few days.  I wish the leaves kept that color, what would be awesome.

I did not know if this new growth was a sign of flowers coming or not, so I checked out the mother plant. No flowers, not right now anyway. 




The flowers for this plant pop from the little red bumps that grow along the stem. When I first really looked at this plant, I thought the bumps were bugs. LOL
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#9 Old Yesterday at 11:49 AM


This is my Heart Leaf Philodendron.   There is nothing special about these plants generally speaking.

They can be easily found. People can spend little or a lot on them depending on how big they are. They're vines, so they love to climb on things and are easy to care for. They like medium light ( no direct sun, it burns their leaves) prefer to dry out between waterings and like to be fed during the growing season.  Depending on where a person lives, the growing season could be year round, so feeding these plants all year in that climate doesn't bother them unless a person overfeeds them. I give mine a shower every time I water it like I do with all of my other plants.  It keeps pests away and allows them to photosynthesize properly.

What makes this one 'special' is the fact that when I got it, most of it was dead from freezing. When I opened the box, the plant was droopy with black leaves and stems.  As I understand it, when plants freeze, it happens from the inside out. This wasn't my fault or the sellers. The plant was packed in a cold bag or thermal bag to protect it from the cold weather.  At the time, I didn't think about saying anything to the seller as it is a philodendron and while they are not made out of iron, I knew it would come back.  In hindsight, I should have contacted the seller just so she would have been aware of what was going on in case anybody else had the same problem. 

I cut the dead stuff off, put this plant along with 2 others ( Philodendron Jade and Dwarf Umbrella) that had the same exact problem under a grow light, in a warm place near a humidifier and waited.  Normally it takes plants about 2 weeks to settle in when I have them shipped.  This trio took over a month and half.  The Dwarf Umbrella came to me with 3 stems, it now has one as the other 2 turned black and died.  There were days I thought none of them would ever sprout new growth.

"Plant people" occasionally talk about how resilient plants are. This usually comes after passive lectures about how hovering over plants and or loving them too much does more harm than good which is true.  When I'm having one of those days where I feel like I'm at odds with everybody and everything,  I count the new leaves on my little Heart Leaf Philodendron.  The only original leaves that came with this plant are the biggest two at the bottom of the pic, the rest is all new growth.

Who sez plants can't teach people things....
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#10 Old Yesterday at 10:08 PM
I wasn't planning on posting here again today, but thanks to a Etsy shop owner who I won't name,  I'm going to.  Should anybody ask me about said shop in the future, I will tell the person that is asking not to buy plants from this person.  What pisses me off about this whole thing is that I ordered from this same person a couple of weeks ago. Sans the soggy soil problem, there was no problem.

I ordered a Silver Ann pothos and a Hoya Pubicalyx from said shop.  For all my worries about Hoyas, they're are really simple sans a couple of species.  The Hoya is fine, the Silver Ann pothos though looks just like my Silver Satin and then there was what I found in the pot when I went about swapping out the soil.  90% of the stems are not rooted. The seller cut up her plant and stuck a bunch of stems in a pot.  If that wasn't bad enough, she left me with another little surprise.




This thing that you are looking at is called a wet stick.  This is a stem of the supposed Silver Ann that has at least one node to grow roots from ( the root is the white, tooth-looking like thing) and a couple of growth nodes. In this picture, one is the yellow nub and there is another next to it that is white-ish.  This 'stick' has all that it needs to grow into a plant, but this is not what I paid for.  If I wanted a bunch of stems shoved in a pot with a wet stick, I could have done this myself for free and I wouldn't have had to deal with gross soil.  What is in the picture is my soil mix, not hers.

Most if not all the leaf stems that are not rooted should sprout roots in a couple of weeks.  I could pull them out and water propagate them, but I don't like that method.  I'd rather they just root themselves in the soil they are in and be done with it.

Except for a few plant related YT channels I watch, I don't bother with the plant community because it is full to the brim with drama, much like the sims community.  I buy plants and talk about them because I enjoy them; people are not going to crap on that.  This problem though is a small part of the drama that happens within the plant community.  People pull this BS, get clapped on for charging money for sticks and so it goes.

Not all Etsy plant shops do this as I've ordered from another one; I have nothing bad to say.  I have a order coming from that person coming today.  I'm not expecting any surprises, but I wasn't expecting this either, so anything goes at this point.

I've filled all my allotted space for plants, so I'm done ordering whether there more surprises waiting for me or not. All the plants I have need time to grow. When they do, I'll have plants coming out of my ears due to propagating. I'll be sure to post updates on how the growth goes with the stick. It should be a good time as I've never grown a plant this way; it will be a adventure for everybody. 
Screenshots
Scholar
#11 Old Yesterday at 10:27 PM
@Gargoyle Cat I love your pics, they make me happy! Cos a e s t h e t i c And also, is that a gargoyle in the background of one of your pics? It kind of looks like one of those grumpy naked cats
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#12 Old Today at 2:34 AM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noa1500
@Gargoyle Cat I love your pics, they make me happy! Cos a e s t h e t i c And also, is that a gargoyle in the background of one of your pics? It kind of looks like one of those grumpy naked cats

Thank you. I've been fighting with myself over getting a new camera. I'm really, really tempted.

Yes, that is a gargoyle. He's one of four.  I have 2 outside and now two in the house.  There is the one that is pictured and I have a smaller that hangs out with my Fiddle Leaf Fig and Rhaphidophora tetrasperma AKA Mini Monstera.

He was picked up from our local garden center that sells all kinds of stuff. He has a spot on the right side of his face or near his nose that looks weird.  I don't know if the mold they used to make him had something wrong with it, maybe a air bubble got into the concrete, I don't know.  It isn't obvious when there isn't a light shining over him, the plant light causes a shadow which makes his face look weird. He can look  grumpy, he's a gargoyle.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#13 Old Today at 10:08 AM
I'm not going to carry on about what happened yesterday with my plant order, but I did want to make sure my eyeballs were not messing with me.




This is a leaf from my Silver Satin.  This plant is roughly 3-4 years old.  Leaf size doesn't matter when making comparisons,  I'm looking at leaf color and variegation.





Here is the plant I was sent.  The orange spots are leaf damage; this is not a Silver Ann or a Silvery Ann,  it's a Silver Satin.  The base color of leaves for a Silvery Ann is a brighter green and the variegation is completely random with some leaves barely having any variegation at all as seen here....  https://garden.org/plants/photo/498000/

When the plant I was sent sets down solid roots, drops its damaged leaves of which there are many, ect... I'll combine this plant with the Silver Satin plant I propagated from the mother plant pictured above. If I really want a Silvery Ann, I'll contact my local garden center and have them get me one if they don't have them in stock when I call them.  They have a greenhouse made specifically for house plants, so it shouldn't be that difficult to get my hands on one as they are not expensive or rare.
Screenshots
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#14 Old Today at 7:47 PM
This post is a 'before' and hopefully there will be great improvement for the 'after'. It is going to be awhile before we get to the after though.




This is a Milky Way Cast Iron plant.  I ordered it because I wanted a plant that would deal with living in the corner of my office where no other plant seems to like it there.  These plants are sold as 'survives in low light' so people stick them in the darkest corners of their rooms, then complain when the plant doesn't thrive.  Low light does not mean no light.  Any plant that is sold as 'low light' will not only survive, but will also thrive in medium light.  If people want a plant just to shove in a dark corner and never grow, there is no shortage of fake plants on the market these days....

With that out of the way, I'm not being that person.  The plant has its own plant light which will be on for at least 8 hours a day, so no neglect here.  This does not mean there are no problems though. This plant is supposed to be dark green, not pale green. It has crinkled leaves which means the grower was not watering it ( it likes moist soil, not soggy feet) and at some point had bug problems as seen in picture 2.



I never expect plants to arrive in perfect condition. I don't expect the plants that already live in my house to be perfect either, but they are taken care of.  I can't fix the damaged leaves, but new ones will grow in. As for the color, I give my plants a weak dose of cleated iron mixed in with their also diluted liquid fertilizer, so I might be able to get some of the plant's original color back.  That is going to take time as I only feed my plants every 2 or so weeks with liquid ferts. All of them get worm castings which are replenished monthly.

As for the bug problem, whatever the pest was, it is gone now.  I ordered a gallon of horticultural spray that is mixed with water for all of my plants as it is nearing that time of year when things get in the house that I don't want in the house, nor chewing on my plants.



Here is the other plant that came with the Cast Iron plant.  It is a Pothos Pictus Exotica which for the most part looks okay, but it still has the abused look about it.  I could understand possible leaf damage around the edges; I don't know what the deal is with the big tear on the leaf to the left.  Both plants were packed well when shipped and had no wiggle room to flop around the box.

I'm just going to call this what it has been... a shit week for plants.
Screenshots
Back to top