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Mad Poster
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#51 Old 8th Jun 2021 at 10:17 AM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 8th Jun 2021 at 1:05 PM. Reason: typo
If somebody told me that I would spend at least part of the summer of 2021 pondering what smells worse, rotten eggs or blood meal, I would have told them that they are crazy. That person however would end up being correct as that's what I've been doing for the past hour or so. I was rudely awakened by a charlie horse and haven't been able to go back to sleep.

I'm still trying to figure out how to deal with the rabbit situation. They don't like the smell of ghost chili pepper as I've since found out. One of them ripped off a leaf of one of the Empress Wu and promptly left it where they were going to sit and have him or herself a snack. Because of the frickin' heatwave, right now the backyard smells like a mix of garlic and red pepper flake. I can't leave newly transplanted plants without water, so I'm currently having to make new batches of things that smell and apply them daily. I can't force plants to establish themselves faster, so making smelly 'tea' is part of the daily routine for the next couple of weeks.

There is a product called Liquid Fence. There are a few versions of it, but the one I heard about via internet is to repel rabbit and deer. I'm not overly impressed by the ingredients list. Egg solids, thyme oil, garlic, diatomaceous earth and sodium lauryl sulfate.

https://www.liquidfence.com/Product...irectionsForUse

A 3 pound bag of blood meal is around $7.00, I'm going to try that first as I have too many reservations about the Liquid Fence. Oil in liquid form of any kind put on leaves of a plant acts like a magnifying glass when sun hit it, so leaves will burn. Food grade diatomaceous earth is fine for humans, but for insects whether the diatomaceous earth is food grade or not acts like tiny shards of glass which kills them from the inside out when ingested. I have no interest in killing off bees, ladybugs and other beneficial insects, so nah.

Rabbits are sensitive to the smell of sulfur which is why Liquid Fence uses egg and garlic.
Mad Poster
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#52 Old 9th Jun 2021 at 2:42 PM


It seems as though Lowe's added a little something to their mulch. I'm now growing mushrooms.

Last night at 10:30 I was outside spreading blood meal in the backyard. I had a audience of one.... a rabbit. He / she sits in the Rose of Sharon garden and watches me; this is not uncommon or unusual. Once I was finished I came in the house, picked a window to watch from and waited. It took about 15 minutes, but I can confirm that rabbits don't like the smell of blood meal. In the case of last night, rabbit got a big nose full blood meal stink and bounced away in the opposite direction. This was the reaction I wanted. I can't say how long the power of stink lasts for. I'm guessing like with any type of non-physical barrier it depends on how much rain happens. As a side note, blood meal is rich in nitrogen, so there is another benefit to using it other than to repel rabbits.

There has been talk about putting up a physical barrier made of chicken wire for the big garden, I don't know. I don't want to do that, but I also don't want to spend all of my time spraying and applying stuff just so I can have plants I enjoy. I haven't exhausted all of the options for non-physical barriers, so we'll see.
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Test Subject
#53 Old 9th Jun 2021 at 8:04 PM
Thank you so much
Mad Poster
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#54 Old 10th Jun 2021 at 12:52 PM
I was going to post a pic of my bucket of sad looking forsythia. I couldn't find a creative way to do it, so that isn't going to happen. My point was going to be that just because a plant looks sad, that doesn't mean all is lost. Even though the leaves on the branches look like crap, the stems have rooted. I gave all of them a gentle tug last night and got resistance which means they can go in the ground soon. Once this first batch comes out, I'll be starting another.

Instead of pictures of wilted forsythia leaves, how about of more mushrooms? I checked the area where these things were growing ( it is the tree stump garden) to make sure I'm not over watering. The moisture level is a 3 on my moisture meter which means I'm not over watering and will have to water this afternoon. I also don't understand why these 2 pics look so different as these shrooms are growing pretty much next to each other. Whatever...




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Mad Poster
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#55 Old 11th Jun 2021 at 12:50 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 11th Jun 2021 at 11:55 PM.
Just when you think you're almost finished, something happens and more is added to the list.

I've talked about The Pit in front of my house on several occasions in other threads. It is town property but the trolls of town hall only care about it when they want to do something such as putting in a sidewalk that nobody asked for or wanted a few years ago. The logic of the genius behind the idea to spend what they don't have on a thing nobody wanted was that if they put in a sidewalk, more people would move into town.

Sidewalks cost money. Money for said sidewalk comes from taxpayers. We already have high property taxes because of all the other crap they've wasted money on. There has yet to be a influx of people moving into town. They're leaving because of high taxes. Wash. rinse. repeat. It goes without saying said trolls never have the time or budget to clean up all the trash that is thrown into the The Pit from all the slobs that either live in town and or just passing through. My day would be incomplete if I didn't clean up nip bottles. Nuff said about that.

Once upon a time, The Pit had a line of oak trees in it. The town and electric company made a backroom deal; now there are no trees. In The Pit there is tree stumps, the above mentioned trash that everybody in the house participates in cleaning up on a regular basis, ferns and weeds. After what happened yesterday, there was discussion about what to do with The Pit. I can't prevent that situation from happening again, but I can give critters cover for when birds of prey are flying over head. If that kind of situation happened on the other side of the driveway, the outcome would have been completely different. There is no pit, and we let that area do what it wants. The forsythia gets cut back as needed, it is home to the big Japanese Andromeda, and any trash that does manage to get in there is cleaned up when we clean up the other side. It is not a easy area for large things with wings to navigate, although small birds can come and go as they please without issue.

Planting trees in The Pit would be nice, but that isn't going to happen as the town will clear cut them. Last year I talked about planting English Ivy there, but after all the crap I went through to get the backyard cleared of English Ivy this year, that isn't happening either. Since the forsythia on the other side of the driveway have proven to take abuse from being slammed with snow and sand at 30-plus miles per hour from snow plows, don't mind not being watered all the time once they are established and could careless if they are cut way back at the end of the growing season, forsythia is going in The Pit. This not a project I anticipate being finished this year, but forsythia bushes are cheap. I can't grow as many as I'd need in a month or two, so buying them is what we'll have to do.

Today we start bringing in the free hosta that we've been offered. Once we get all of those in the ground in the backyard, we'll start planting things in the front yard. We still have a planter to build, but that can wait until fall. If it doesn't happen at all this year, it isn't a big deal.

EDIT: We've got most of the hosta in the ground. We need to get the rest of them tomorrow. It is going to be either take two vehicles or two trips as the big hosta still need to be dug up and moved. Overall, most of them look pretty good considering they've been left to their own devices to grow in a middle of a field. There is some mechanical or leaf damage on the medium ones as apparently those leaves were in contact with pavement; not a big deal. No plant is perfect and some minor leaf damage isn't going to bother anything.
Mad Poster
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#56 Old 12th Jun 2021 at 3:49 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 12th Jun 2021 at 8:43 PM.
This thread is not going to be taken over by posts about hawks, but in order to understand / figure something out / fix a problem, I talk about it. This is how my brain works. I learn better through doing rather than just reading.

I spent almost 2 hours last night doing research on how to humanely repel hawks. They are beautiful birds that are very intelligent as most birds in the raptor family are. With that intelligence comes problems. Once they decide a area is a good food supply, they don't go away. We had a red-tail circling around the yard yesterday afternoon. Resident rabbit was nowhere to be found, because of the time of day, the chipmunks were in their hidey-holes in the backyard and there wasn't much around. If there was 'food' around, because we were working on the yard, nothing would have happened as hawks don't like humans.

We do have a owl decoy that we've had for a long time. It was purchased because my mother loves owls rather than to repel things. The decoy has since been moved to the wall that sits in front of The Pit as The Pit is the problem area. Because hawks are intelligent, the owl will have to be moved every few days to a different spot as they will figure out that the decoy is a inanimate object will continue to circle / hunt in that area. This isn't a big deal as I'm out front to check the mail, water the gardens, ect... anyway. I just have to make a habit of doing it.

Birds of prey and birds in general do not like things that reflect sunlight as it messes with their eyesight. There is a bunch of different things sold on Amazon for this, but for the sake of simplicity, we're going to try a something called scare tape. This tape doesn't have any adhesive on it, but it is shiny, reflects light and makes noise when the wind blows. It can be tied to things, wrapped around stuff and so on. If people don't want birds pooping on their patio furniture, this is a good thing to use. It might look weird, but it's better than having to clean before you sit or worse, sit in bird poop.

There are no trees in The Pit, the town took those down so I don't have to worry about perching. The problem oak on the other side of the driveway was taken down a month or so ago because the top of it was dead. There are trees on the far left side of The Pit, but the vegetation is dense there. If I need to, I can add some scare tape to the birch tree. From what I can tell, the hawks are not coming in from that direction. If and when they come in, they're doing so from across the street as my neighbors yard is large and open.

When I called my local garden center about the scare tape, the person I spoke with said that scare tape works well for woodpeckers, but he wasn't sure if it would work with hawks or not. The tape is under $4.00 a roll, so if it doesn't work, I'm not out a ton of cash. My goal is to bide us time to get The Pit planted with stuff to block a hawk's view. Their eyesight is 8 times better than a humans and they don't like densely planted areas because A) they can't see through things like brush and leaves B) their wingspan. Once I'm comfortable with what we've done, all of this stuff will go away sans the owl decoy. He will go back in his spot near the Japanese Maple.

Upon looking around the yard for forsythia that we could take from the other side of the driveway while not removing cover from that side of the yard, we found a bunch of small forsythia plants that rooted themselves. The soil and the amount of sun are the same for both sides of the driveway, so we can move some of that. It isn't going to fix the problem, but it's a start; I have to start somewhere.

Other suggestions I read about where things like getting a dog, and or a rooster. Roosters are 'guardian' animals, kind of like llamas, but I'm not interested in either of those. I have two dogs, neither of which are going to patrol the perimeter of the property and I don't want livestock to house, maintain and feed. I think I'd have to get a permit for that which I'm also not going to do as my property is not zoned for that.

Another suggestion was don't have bird feeders as that makes for a easy meal for hawks. I know this for fact as we went through this a couple of years ago. Hawks would come in and sit on the fence posts. Then they would wait for the birds to come in to eat. I found one too many piles of mourning dove feathers around the yard because I had bird feeders, so we stopped feeding the birds. I really enjoyed it and I miss it, but it isn't worth it. Hawks are not nice when they kill their prey. Unlike falcons that instantly kill their food, hawks do not. They use their claws to pierce internal organs which makes for a long, painful death. While I fully understand the whole ecosystem / food chain thing, I'm not cool with witnessing that regardless of whether I see it, hear it or both. This is what happened the other day; I'm struggling to get that scene out of my head. All the more reason to get The Pit planted and dealt with.

EDIT: The big hosta are here and are in the ground. Pictured is not all of them, but you get the idea of their size. I don't know these species of these hosta, but the look like Empress Wu. They're droopy from being moved. In few weeks along with some fertilizer, they'll perk up.

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Mad Poster
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#57 Old 14th Jun 2021 at 2:39 PM
The grass seed around the tree stump garden has finally decided to do something. I don't know if it's the Pennington seed, the Scott's seed or both, but I'll take the wisps of new grass either way. We still need to do the edging around that garden, the grass needs to hurry up and grow so we can finish that project.

Big hostas are doing well. My hose is a couple feet too short to reach the ones along the back fence, so in order to make sure they are watered and get enough water, I have to fill / lug buckets of water. If anybody wants a good arm workout, lugging around buckets of water will do it. I have to do the same thing for the forsythia in the front yard.

The Peace Lily I bought almost 3 years ago after Foo Dog was put down has decided to flower. In all the time I've had it, it hasn't flowered until now. I didn't notice the flower last night when I shut plants lights off so it either popped during the night or I just didn't notice as I was exhausted and in bed by 8:30 last night.

I don't have any plant / garden projects planned for today. If I come across a houseplant that needs water, I'll water it, but other than that, no garden stuff today. It is already hot outside and I'm draggin' butt. It will be a day of doing stupid things like cleaning the bathroom, putting groceries away when they show up, ect... Yesterday I sat outside for a couple of hours in the shade and did absolutely nothing other than watch rabbit eat grass, chipmunks investigate and dragonflies use the bamboo stakes I'm using as grass seed markers ( AKA to keep humans and dogs off of the grass seed) as landing / launching pads. It was these kinds of afternoons I had in mind when I decided to lean into yard projects this year. It will be better without the bamboo stakes, but for the most part, I've gotten what I had in mind / wanted.
Mad Poster
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#58 Old 17th Jun 2021 at 10:23 PM
Phew! I've been outside watering / fertilizing what is slowly turning into the jungle outside. All of the new plants had fresh soil with fertilizer in it, but I'm not sure how long the ferts hung around for after all the rain we've had lately. In the event there is some fertilizer left in the ground from the new soil, I watered down what I was giving to 1/4 strength and perhaps even less than that. Next month plants are going to want to spend more time 'resting' than growing, so they should be good for awhile. I should also have enough ferts to get me through the rest of the growing season so I won't have to order more.

Most of the hosta have flower blooms on them. Others do not either because of stress from being moved or munched by rabbit or deer. The newest editions have several flower buds which I wasn't expecting. The humming birds are just waiting to stick their beaks into said flowers. Every morning and afternoon right before dusk they come out and make the rounds to see which flowers have opened. Soon after the hosta flowers open, the Rose of Sharon should be showing signs of flowering as well.

The blood meal is working well for a invisible rabbit barrier. I haven't been spraying and also haven't seen any freshly munched leaves. That could all change tomorrow, but so far so good.
Mad Poster
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#59 Old 18th Jun 2021 at 2:56 PM
The hell corner is soon to at least look less hellish as the grass seed I put down on the 12th is starting to come up. I suspect it will have to be seeded a few times to fill in bald patches and where the chipmunks keep burying things. They've been burying acorns in the big hosta garden as well, I keep picking out oak tree saplings.

Speaking of hosta...



I wanted a picture of a hosta bloom without the stem; I got what I wanted. The problem is it looks like I took one picture and pasted it to a blurred out background. LOL! I didn't do that, you can zoom in and check if you must. I use a Canon 1.8 50mm lens which is fixed. Whatever the lens focuses on is what is in focus for the picture.
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Mad Poster
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#60 Old 19th Jun 2021 at 5:04 PM
This is a brainstorming post. I don't own this plant and haven't bought it...yet. Plants from Japan have the coolest name. Below is a Japanese Anemone hybrid called Fall in love sweetly



It has been suggested that we move the forsythia that is in front of the wall to The Pit so we make progress with that whole situation. Initially I was against it only because critters like to hide under them, but then I had a duh moment. The spots don't have to be bare, the plants can be replaced with something else. I left the thought with that until these shrubs were mentioned in a newsletter, now I want some. We don't have much that blooms in the fall or that is showy in terms of flowers; these would fit the bill.

Image from here... https://www.provenwinners.com/plant...-anemone-hybrid
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Mad Poster
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#61 Old 20th Jun 2021 at 7:18 PM
Yesterday I posted about moving the forsythia that is on the lawn side of the wall. Apparently that plan has changed, but I wasn't made aware of it. Now the plan is to keep the forsythia where it is, and put a Japanese Anemone where the walkway to the front door starts. Don't you love it when people change plans and don't say anything? SMH

Anywho... it is lily season at the moment in my neck of the woods.

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Mad Poster
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#62 Old 24th Jun 2021 at 10:13 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 25th Jun 2021 at 2:28 AM.
Poison ivy is like the whack-a-mole in the plant world. You get rid of it in one spot only for it to pop up somewhere else. It has been sprayed and since my sprayer is leaking for some reason, it is being kept in a trash can with a lid. No need for critters of any kind to be getting into that stuff.

Resident rabbit and I were having a silent disagreement this afternoon. Rabbit insists on munching on the new grass that hasn't finished sprouting yet. I don't want rabbits, dogs or humans near said grass until it is grown and hardened off. After three times of shoo'ing rabbit away, I dragged out a bag of bone meal. All areas that have new grass coming up have been treated. I don't feel bad. Rabbit has the entire front yard, 99.5% of the backyard and all of the area outside of the fence line to chew on.

Forsythia plants from Proven Winners came in. I would have preferred if the plants were a little bigger, but other than that, they were packed well and are healthy. Forsythia grows anywhere from a 1-3 feet per growing season, so they won't be small for long.



I called the tree people. I've been looking at the Japanese Maple which is in dire need of a trim. We've cut damaged branches off of it, but we've never had a arborist come out and professionally trim it; it shows. It has no shape and is out of control. No point in spending all this time and effort on the yard only to have the 'star' of the front yard looking all kinds of crazy. I'll be getting a estimate for that next week.

EDIT: I was thinking the other day that come next spring I won't have anything to talk about in this thread. That was a lie! LOL

Proven Winners sent me two magazine-type things with my order. They have digital versions that people can read for free ( one will be linked down below) but the one that triggered my brain into overdrive is called Gardening Simplified. One page 82-83 they have plant suggestions for a wildlife garden. Yup, I want one of those. They have some good plant suggestions for in front of the wall. The deer resistant, drought tolerant and get fairly large which means less lawn to deal with.

Magazine: http://digitaledition.qwinc.com/publication/?i=690731

The pages I was referring to: http://digitaledition.qwinc.com/pub...&p=82&ver=html5
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Mad Poster
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#63 Old 25th Jun 2021 at 8:30 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 26th Jun 2021 at 1:32 AM.
I've been doing a lot of thinking today while cleaning, doing laundry, ect... FYI: None of the pictures in this post are mine. They're all from Proven Winners website. I tried to keep them fairly consistent in size, and so on, but ya know. All of the sources for them are linked below.

I don't like the German iris' that are in one of the the planters we built. They look like crap and didn't transplant well, so they are leaving when the dumpster gets here and will be replaced with something else.



This is a Black Lace elderberry. They are deer resistant, do well in planters and can berry if they have a pollinator. I don't care about the berries as they are toxic to pets. Not that any of my pets would be munching on them but I'd rather not poison any neighborhood pet that may find the berries tempting either. I like this plant for the foliage and color. The fact that it flowers is a added bonus. Mine will not be this big when it hits maturity as it will be kept trimmed.

Then we have a weird spot in the driveway that needs to be dealt with. The best way to explain it is the driveway is shaped like the letter U. The empty space of the U shape used to have a pine tree which was cut down a number of years ago before it fell down. Now we have some other kind of tree growing there; I have no idea what it is. At first I thought it was a birch, but it isn't. It isn't oak tree or a maple. Like I said, I have no clue. Regardless, I don't want a mystery tree there. I want something that has some visual heft and the birds can get into if they want.

My original thought was to get a Lawson's False Cypress called Haywire, but they can develop a spread of 18 feet. We could have that amount of space if everybody parked on the actual driveway, but nobody uses it because it is easier to come and go around the U.



Haywire- I'm determined to find a spot for one of these in the yard. It may not happen this year, but I will have one. What I decided to go with is a Soft Serve False Cypress.



These come in green and what is called gold, I'm going with the green version. They have a height of around 10 feet and a bottom spread of about 7 feet. There is roughly 12 feet in the empty space that I'm looking to fill. According to the description, these unlike other cypress are soft to the touch.

All of this got me thinking about the non-pit side of the driveway and how I could possibly go about creating a 'secret garden' there. The only part of it that would make it secret is the fact that it would be hidden from the street by the wall of forsythia bushes. We have left over flagstone that we could use as a pathway, so it would be a matter of finding plants that would not only do well there, but also provide critter cover.

There is nothing concrete about this idea, but I will be looking for inspiration pictures to see what I can come up with.

Black Lace: https://www.provenwinners.com/plant/43969/images

Haywire: https://www.provenwinners.com/plant...aris-lawsoniana

Soft Serve: https://www.provenwinners.com/plant/44857/images

EDIT: We've got the new forsythia bushes in the ground. They were easy to plant as everything is wet from it raining most of the day.

There is agreement about the Soft Serve cypress and were to put it, but even more exciting is we may have found a spot for a Haywire. It would be in the backyard, but who cares. I would be planting it for me, not the neighborhood.

Is it crazy getting excited about planting trees? Probably, but whatever. There are far worse things I could be doing.
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Mad Poster
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#64 Old 26th Jun 2021 at 5:03 PM
Trees have been ordered. They should be shipped after the mini heatwave we have coming. I also ordered 2 plants called Peter Cottontail. They have pretty white flowers, but I really ordered for their name. LOL They are rabbit and deer resistant, but rabbits can use them to hide under or behind.



These will be going in the hell corner which by next year I'm hoping we can call it something a little nicer.

We've got some digging to do before the trees get here. We have to remove the mystery tree that is in the middle of the driveway. I still have no idea what it is, but a much bigger version of it was discovered in the side yard. Whatever it is, it is really invasive so I'm glad it is going away. We also have to dig up a clump of forsythia and move it to the other side of the wall.

You know I'm excited about something when I start talking about decorating something with Christmas lights which happened this morning. I won't be decorating the Haywire with Christmas lights this year, but next year, lights are going on it.

Image link: https://www.provenwinners.com/plant...hillea-ptarmica
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Mad Poster
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#65 Old 27th Jun 2021 at 3:36 AM
I figured out what the new pest plant is that is taking over my property. I used this website ( https://plantnet.org/en/ ) to help me figure it out. What I'm dealing with is Prunus serotina Ehrh which has many common names:

Rum cherry
Wild cherry
Black cherry
Mexican Cherry
Timber cherry
American bird cherry
Black chokecherry
Rum cherry, black cherry
Wild Black Cherry
Black choke
Cabinet cherry
American Cherry
Whisky Cherry

What helped me identify it was a picture on the above website; I recognized the flowers.



From what I've read, this plant is highly invasive and is spread much like bittersweet. Birds eat the berries, they poop the seeds out, seeds plant themselves and the next thing you know, the stupid plants are everywhere. From the past hour or so that I've been reading, apparently this plant has been causing lots of problems in Europe.

I'd like to know which moron neighbor of mine decided that keeping this plant around was a good idea. Probably the same one that thought it was cool to allow bittersweet grow to the point that it was draped over telephone lines. UGH!

Image link: https://identify.plantnet.org/the-p...ions/1006730178
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Mad Poster
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#66 Old 28th Jun 2021 at 12:29 PM
It is 80 degrees outside and it is only going on 7:30 AM. Blech!

The last time I posted a pic of the stump, there was a yellow ring around it. The ring is now mostly filled in. There are areas that will have to be seeded a few more times, but it's done for the most part. The goal is not to have a perfect lawn, not that I could have that anyway with dogs. Dog urine destroys grass. It is supposed to be much cooler this weekend. Hopefully we can finally get the edging done for this garden. It feels like it has taken forever to get to this point.

Ignore the bamboo stakes. They are there to keep humans and dogs off of the new grass.

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#67 Old 30th Jun 2021 at 3:33 PM
The trees and plants we ordered will be in tomorrow. They will have only been in the shipping process for 2 days, so there shouldn't be any problems. Unless something really leaps out at me and I have to have it, I think we're done with buying plants for this year. We'll still buy things like mulch and grass seed, but for plants, I don't feel like taking on more planting projects this year. There is no shortage of things to do; we don't need more to tend to.

There are weeds sprouting in the big hosta garden, there is poison ivy popping up in the hell corner and of course there is the black cherry tree ordeal. It has been too hot to deal with anything over the past couple of days. I was sick last night and didn't feel so great when I got up this morning. We were down to 2 air conditioners which didn't do much. The kitchen was 95 degrees by 3:00 PM yesterday afternoon, so we got a third one. They're all set to between 73 - 75 degrees; we'll see what the outcome of that is later today. I digress.

If we're going to build the planter at the end of the driveway in the fall like we planned on, it can sit empty until the spring. I'm not sure if that is going to happen or not as we'll be getting a estimate for a new fence tomorrow. The fence is more important, the planter can wait.

Indoor plants, especially the jungle-y ones are loving this disgusting weather we're having. The 3 plants I have sitting next to me on the file cabinet ( Silver Satin pothos, Golden pothos and Neon Philodendron) are starting to encroach on my space. The Silver Satin needs to be trimmed again, the Golden pothos was trimmed about a month ago and will probably need another trim by the end of July and the Neon Philodendron should be ready to size up a pot around the same time. The three small plants I bought and potted together are still hanging out in a 2 inch pot.

I have hoya vines all over the place. I've come to love and enjoy hoya, but I think I spent more time dodging their vines than it took to water them the other day. The Monstera deliciosa is loving life as is the Monstera adansonii and the mini Monstera. I cut the mini back few weeks ago as it had a single vine growing up the wall. I didn't want aerial roots growing into the wall because they will if you allow it, so I cut it back and tried my hand at propagating Monstera. It didn't take much effort on my part, the cutting has all new growth points. It will be a full plant in a couple of months. As much as I enjoy buying houseplants, I don't need more of those either. As it is, I'm thinking about converting my office into a plant room as the ones I have already are going to want more space, at some point.
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#68 Old 30th Jun 2021 at 9:24 PM
I don't know where I want to put this post but since it is yard related, it can live here.

I had the tree people come out to give me a estimate to reign in the unruly Japanese Maple that currently looks like it stuck one of its branches in a electrical outlet. Because it is a small tree, it isn't going to a lot of money to get that cleaned up. Once that was taken care of and agreed to, we started talking about the pile of brush sitting in the side yard from a few days ago.

Long story short, I almost canceled the dumpster. Through conversation, it was revealed to me that for less than half of the price for the dumpster, the tree company would come to the house with their chipper, chip down the entire brush pile and I could keep whatever mulch came from it. The only reason I didn't cancel the dumpster order was because the tree company won't shred leaves and we have a big pile of leaves to deal with. Because I want mulch for The Pit and nobody believes that I'm going to fit all that I want into a 10-yard dumpster, a plan was created.

We are going to leave the current brush pile as it is. Once we fill up the dumpster with leaves, black cherry trees and whatever else we can fit into it, any remaining brush, tree limbs and branches will be added to the current pile. Once the dumpster goes away, the tree people will come back and chip the pile done here at the house with their chipper. If I have them come out later in the day, not only do I get to keep the mulch from our crap, but I also get whatever is on the truck from was chipped earlier in the day. That could equate to a huge amount of mulch. To do this is still going to cost me a fraction of the dumpster because as I mentioned, nobody thinks everything is going to fit and they're probably right. If we had no plans of clearing out the areas behind the fence, everything would have probably fit.

All of this is a important lesson going forward; now we just need to find a way to deal with leaves which isn't complicated. Instead of putting them into a pile where they will only break down during the warmer months, leave them on the lawn and shred them with the lawnmower. It's free food for the lawn and prevents having a mountain of leaves to get rid of.

Have I mentioned that I love dealing with small businesses lately? When businesses and customers have a good relationship, good things come from it for both parties involved.
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#69 Old 2nd Jul 2021 at 8:57 PM
The moment new Monstera deliciosa owners like myself wait for...



When the plant matures enough that it develops leaf fenestrations or holes in the leaves. There are articles that claim plants have to be 3 feet tall before this happens, my deliciosa is nowhere near that. The tallest leaf from the top of the pot to the leaf tip is about a foot and half.

Both the Haywire and Soft Serve cypress trees are planted. I want more of both, lots more. We don't have the space for more Haywires, but I might be able to get at least one more Soft Serve in somewhere after the fence is done.

The Black Lace looks silly right now as it is sitting in the middle of a huge planter, but by next year it won't look so lost. The Peter Cottontails were also planted, but we had to change where to put them because of having a new fence installed. That project isn't happening until at least the end of August because fencing is a PITA to get right now, but I don't want to get plants situated in one spot, then have to move them. If the fence was being done in a couple of weeks, a plant or plants would have time to re-adjust, but since it won't be until August, that's pushing it and while everything would probably be fine, I'd rather not try my luck. That being said, I need to order more of them so they can happily live in the backyard along the foundation of the house. I've struggled to find something that does well there; they should.

We've made a big dent in the brush pile in the side yard. For now we're just putting leaves in the dumpster; I don't think we're going to have enough leaves to fill it. We now have 3 piles of brush and haven't even gotten to where most of the black cherry trees are yet. I think it is going to end up being more brush than leaves which is fine as brush is still 'organic matter' but I think there was a hope that all of the brush would be chipped. We could make that happen, but it would be a waste of money to send the dumpster back less than half full.

It is cool outside. I actually got goosebumps trying to figure out how many Peter Cottontail plants to order, but it's damp. It has been raining since yesterday. Once the thunderstorms blew by, the cool air moved in. I'm not complaining, I just wish we could get a decent break from the rain so the chainsaw can come out. Instead of waiting for Mother Nature to cooperate, we're just leaning in and getting stuff done. When we do get a break from the rain, we'll get as much cutting done as we can; rinse, wash, repeat. The mess wasn't created in a day, we're not going to get it cleaned up in a day.
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Mad Poster
Original Poster
#70 Old 3rd Jul 2021 at 4:30 PM
I have nothing to blab about at the moment, so it can be a picture day.



I've got mushrooms popping up all over the place from all of the rain we've been having.



Baby Haywire Cypress



Baby Soft Serve Cypress

It is weird to talk about how plants smell aside from flowers and Christmas trees, but cypress smell good as well. And yes, I am one of those people who when gets near a rosemary bush, I rub the leaves just so I can have the smell of the oil on my hands.
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Mad Poster
Original Poster
#71 Old 6th Jul 2021 at 7:40 PM Last edited by Gargoyle Cat : 6th Jul 2021 at 7:59 PM.
The more you look for something, the more you will find.

We've been having problems with trees and things dying off in the side yard or the side that faces the side street; nothing grows there. Since we've been so busy with cleaning things up around here, it was time to figure out what was causing the problem. It didn't take much to figure it out.

All the people that have houses on that street use a landscaper / landscapers. I don't know if it is a single company that does all of the properties or if there is more than one. I'll know that next week, as I'm going to make it a point to pay attention. I digress. The reason nothing will grow in that area is because the landscaper or landscapers have been dumping their shit on our property. There are literally piles of grass sitting in a soggy mounds. That area hardly gets any sun, so these soggy, mushy mounds of disgusting-looking grass never dries out. Because it never dries out, it is causing the roots of the trees and anything else that tries to grow there to rot.

So now the question becomes what to do about it. My initial reaction is to install a frickin' electric fence. They'll get zapped once and won't be wanting to deal with that again. I can say with most certainty that won't end up being the solution, but something is going to be done about it. We don't go around dumping trash and crap on the neighbors properties and yet they're okay with doing it to us. Assholes!

EDIT: Pic added



If you look in the lower right-hand corner, you will see a soggy, dead tree that fell over at some point.
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Mad Poster
Original Poster
#72 Old 13th Jul 2021 at 4:47 PM


This is out of focus, but it is one of the new Japanese Andromedia showing off it's new growth.



This is the hydrangea that we transplanted last fall after much debate about whether to keep it or not. It has settled nicely in it's new spot.
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Test Subject
#73 Old 19th Jul 2021 at 11:52 AM Last edited by sharmaayushb : 2nd Aug 2021 at 8:33 AM.
I'm testing this with my last 2 packs of Philodendron Hope seeds. They took just over a month to sprout using the pot method. These seeds are not known to readily sprout and can be finicky. It took just over a month before they sprouted using the pot and soil method. We'll see what happens using this method. teatv e sadhana
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#74 Old 19th Jul 2021 at 12:57 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by sharmaayushb
I'm testing this with my last 2 packs of Philodendron Hope seeds. They took just over a month to sprout using the pot method. These seeds are not known to readily sprout and can be finicky. It took just over a month before they sprouted using the pot and soil method. We'll see what happens using this method.


Philodendron Hope seeds are no joke. I started mine a few months ago with soil in a pot, here is what the plant looks like at the moment. This is from one pack of seeds. I killed the seeds from the second pack trying to spout them using the damp paper towel / plastic bag method.



They look like crap as I keep forgetting to water them and they need to be repotted. I have no idea when this plant spouts it's 'adult' leaves as these are not those. Maybe bumping them up into a 3" pot with better soil that holds more moisture will help with that. Considering how long it has taken to get to this point, I'm not holding my breath. LOL
Mad Poster
Original Poster
#75 Old 20th Jul 2021 at 2:05 PM
I repotted the Philodendron Hope seedlings yesterday as yesterday was 'plant care' day. Whoever needed water, dead leaves removed, ect... got it. All of the plants got a dose of worm castings. Next year I'm doing things a lot differently than I did this year when it comes to fertilizer.

I spent a lot of money on liquid fertilizer this year when it wasn't necessary. The plants outside will still get liquid ferts as they have a lot more water to deal with because rain. The plants in the house are watered thoroughly when they need it, but I think I can get away with giving them worm castings and they should be fine. The soil I have them has a lot of organic matter that breaks down over time as well, so the plants will not be deprived of their nutritional needs.

None of this was the point of this post; I'm thinking 'out loud'. The Rose of Sharon is showing off. I needed to get in on it before the Japanese Beatles destroy all of the flower buds as they like to do that.

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